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Diets

Gluten-Free Nut and Seed Flour Alternatives

Posted by on Jun 26, 2013 in gluten-free | 0 comments

On a gluten-free diet? Or just want to try some alternative flours for baking, thickening soups and stews or other applications? Then you’ve come to the right place. There are many gluten-free flour alternatives, some of which are also whole grain. In this piece, we’ll review gluten-free nut- and seed-based meals/flours such as almond meal/flour, peanut flour and flaxseed meal/flour. Gluten-free nut-based meals/flours: Almond meal (almond flour) is made from blanched almonds is low in carbohydrates and high in protein. Completely gluten-free, it contains heart-healthy unsaturated fats and makes crusts crunchy, adds moisture and a nutty flavor to pastries, baked goods and dessert fillings. A 3/4 cup serving offers 6g protein, 3.5g fiber, 14g fat (nearly all unsaturated) and a whopping 10 IU (International Units) of vitamin E (roughly 35% of the Recommended Daily Value). The typical American diet, even a fairly healthy diet, often comes up short on this important antioxidant. Because of its unsaturated fat content, almond meal has a short shelf life. Peanut flour is made from crushed peanuts that have been partially or fully defatted. Peanut flour is high in protein, offering 8g per 1/4 cup, defatted. Use this gluten-free alternative to thicken soups, sauces and stews, add a nutty flavor to baked goods or savory main dishes. Gluten-free seed-based meal/flour: Flaxseed meal, made by milling whole flaxseeds, is available at many grocers bagged and ready-to-use. Add flaxseed meal to smoothies, yogurt and cereals. The health benefits of naturally gluten-free flaxseeds are many. They offer anti-cancer benefits (particularly breast cancer as they contain lignans, compounds with antioxidant and anti-estrogen properties). Flaxseeds are a rich source of dietary fiber (4g per 2 tbsp. of flaxseed meal) and are an excellent plant source of the heart-healthy omega-3 essential fatty acids (1.8g per tbsp. ground flaxseed). In baked goods, you can use flaxseed meal in your gluten-free baking as a fat or egg substitute. Flaxseed meal also has a short shelf life and should be kept in an airtight container in the...

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Gluten-Free Diet Q&A

Posted by on May 30, 2013 in gluten-free | 0 comments

Gluten-Free Diet Q&A

What is a gluten-free diet and who is it best for? Registered dietitians (RDs) and medical doctors recommend those with diagnosed celiac disease adhere to a gluten-free diet. Individuals with celiac disease suffer from a variety of symptoms, gastrointestinal and otherwise, whenever they consume gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye, barley and (possibly) oat. It is an immune system response. Even if a physician is able to rule out celiac disease, you can still suffer from a ‘gluten sensitivity.’ This is hard to prove or disprove because it is based on numerous non-specific symptoms such as gas, bloating and abdominal pain, headaches and skin conditions (without another likely cause)…even depression. If symptoms become less severe or disappear by following a gluten-free diet, it might be right for you. However, following a gluten-free diet is not easy and can be expensive. In addition, and gluten-free food products are not necessarily healthier, despite popular belief. Why have gluten-free diets gained popularity within the past decade? A combination of factors is likely responsible for the gluten-free diet’s popularity. The number of official diagnoses has increased significantly in the 10 to 12 years. This is mainly due to an increase in Celiac disease incidence and increased public awareness. According to the University of Chicago, it is estimated that just over one in 130 individuals suffer from Celiac disease in the U.S., but twice as many individuals experience ‘related’ symptoms. Celiac disease runs in families, particularly among first degree relatives. Some [experts] believe that Celiac disease is related to our development and foods we ate when we were young. The theory is that some decades ago we were not exposed to certain antigens in the environment that are present today. In past years the environment/food supply was “cleaner” than it is now. Whether or not this is true, these theories are transmitted through media and appear in books, fueling the gluten-free diet rage. Because of increased public awareness and diagnoses, bookstores, restaurants, supermarkets and products have followed suit, attempting to keep up with the demand by jumping on the gluten-free bandwagon. There is also the celebrity trend angle. The gluten-free diet has become a popular venue (with celebrities) for promoting overall health, alleviating numerous ailments and aiding in weight loss. It is not a weight loss diet, however, celebrity diets tend to influence the public. Finally, there is the ‘eating gluten-free is healthier’ belief. At least 1/3 of those that purchase gluten-free products believe that they are actually healthier than conventional options. Gluten-free food products may be less nutrient-dense, lower in dietary fiber and higher in calories than their whole grain...

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Lentils Nutrition Benefits

Posted by on Feb 8, 2013 in vegetarian | 0 comments

Lentils Nutrition Benefits

Light and small are two words appropriate for  describing the appearance of lentils, but looks can be deceiving. These lens-shaped legumes are one of the true ‘heavyweights’ when in comes to nutrition powerhouses. Lentils are especially appropriate to add to your diet during the Lenten season, when some individuals restrict meat consumption. Within the legume family, lentils are one of the highest in protein content. They are excellent/good sources of the following nutrients, vitamins and minerals: iron, calcium, magnesium, phytochemicals and folate (an important B-vitamin, especially for women in child-bearing years, that helps the body manufacture blood cells). ALL legumes are very high in dietary fiber and lentils are no exception, packing 4 to 10 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup (depending upon type, size, cooking method). Remember, the American Dietetic Association recommends that healthy adults consume approximately 25-35 grams of fiber daily. Lentils are among the most ancient of legumes as well. You can find a broader variety of this legume throughout Europe, the Middle East, India and Africa. Sold in a huge variety of colors –black, green, yellow, orange — and flavors, lentils offer versatility for home cooks as a nearly fat-free meat substitute and guilt-free budget-stretcher side dish. In the United States, red, brown and green lentils are the most common. Their quick-cook applications make them perfect for health-conscious cooks in modern times. and lentils fit perfectly in Lenten meals. Unlike dried beans, lentils need not be soaked in water for hours. In fact, they cook in 20-30 minutes. In addition, cooked lentils will last up to three days when kept covered in the refrigerator. Use lentils in soups, add them to other vegetables and casserole mixtures or serve them cold in salads. Brown and green lentils hold their shape when cooked, while red lentils work best in puree, soups and stews where a soft texture is desired. Once you discover their ease of preparation and healthful attributes, you will understand the popularity of lentils far beyond the Lenten season. Follow these basics in the care and cooking of lentils. Lentils are simple to prepare. Sort, remove any debris. Then rinse and boil 15-20 minutes. There is no need to soak lentils. Also, do not add salt to lentils while cooking because this can make them tough. Storing lentils is simple. They keep indefinitely in a cool, dry place. After long storage, the color may fade slightly, but the taste shouldn’t be noticeably...

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Mediterranean Diet reduces Diabetes Risk

Posted by on Nov 18, 2012 in mediterranean | 0 comments

Mediterranean Diet reduces Diabetes Risk

What is the Mediterranean diet? Well, it is one typically rich in pasta, bread, fruit, and vegetables, (high in fiber and low in trans fats) with moderate amounts of poultry and fish, using liberal amounts of virgin olive oil and a moderate amount of alcohol (specifically red wine). The Mediterranean diet is reputed to be among the healthiest in the world. Multiple research studies have shown that Mediterraneans suffer less heart disease than people from northern Europe. Nutrition experts believe that the typical Mediterranean diet reduces ‘bad’ or saturated fat and increasing the level of natural antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, significantly reducing the risk of heart attack. A landmark research study (prospective, cohort) showed a startlingly positive, strong correlation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and a decreased risk of developing diabetes. Mediterranean diet: research This study involved over 13,000 graduates from the University of Navarra, Spain (with no history of diabetes), whose dietary habits and health were tracked over 8 years. Initially, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire designed to measure the entire diet, including questions on the use of fats and oils, cooking methods and dietary supplements. Every two years participants were sent follow-up questionnaires on diet, lifestyle, risk factors, and medical conditions. During the follow-up period the researchers from the University of Navarra found that participants who stuck closely to the diet had a lower risk of diabetes. A high adherence to the diet was associated with an 83% relative reduction in the risk of developing diabetes. Adherence measures how closely the participant followed the Mediterranean diet guidelines using a numerical scale. On a ten-point scale (0-2 for low, 3-6 for medium and 7-9 for high Mediterranean diet adherence) researchers discovered that each 2 point increase on the adherence scale had a corresponding 35% reduction in diabetes risk! Benefits from consuming a diet rich in plant foods (including fat) and low in processed foods? Who would’ve...

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Snacks part 2: Best low calorie snacks

Posted by on May 9, 2012 in eat smart, vegetarian | 0 comments

Snacks part 2: Best low calorie snacks

Now that we have taken a look at the best low calorie dairy snacks, it’s time to move on to part 2: Best low calorie crunchy snacks. Let’s review the basic criteria for a ‘healthy’ snack? Keep the following in mind when choosing your snacks: Offer between 100 and 200 calories Are fat-controlled (unless it’s heart-healthy unsaturated fat), providing 0 g trans fats and 3 g saturated fat or less per serving Are relatively low in sodium; strive to limit the sodium in your low-calorie snacks to 400 mg or less Are nutrient-rich: a good food source of protein, dietary fiber and/or key vitamin and minerals (such as iron, vitamins A, C or calcium) Offer a little something extra: are available in calorie-controlled portions, contain no high-fructose corn syrup and little added sugar; are gluten or lactose-free, have added omega-3 fatty acids, etc… These snacks are all about convenience – they are widely available and take no preparation time/work. Another benefit of these snacks is that they are all healthy for a vegetarian/vegan. Snacks: Top 3 low-calorie crunchy picks Crispy snacks: Best pick Popcorn, Indiana Sea Salt Chip’ins: ‘Popcorn’ chips are the hottest new snacks in the chip aisle. They are made with simple, all natural ingredients: corn, sunflower oil, and sea salt. They are ‘popped’ instead of baked and have an extra crispy texture. These crunchy snacks are whole-grain based and gluten-free. They come in a variety of other flavors, such as Classic BBQ and White Cheddar. A 1-oz. serving of the Sea Salt Chip’ins provides 120 calories, 2.5 g fat, 0 g saturated/trans fats, 22 g carbohydrates, 2 g protein, 1 g dietary fiber and 230 mg sodium. For an extra nutrition boost, make a homemade salsa for dipping with diced tomato, red onion, jalapeno or Serrano pepper, lime juice, chopped cilantro and a dash of pepper, sea salt and cumin (optional) to taste. Nutty snacks: Top choice Blue Diamond Oven Roasted Almonds: These oven roasted almond snacks come in many flavors, sweet flavors, such as butter toffee and cinnamon brown sugar and savory flavors, such as plain and sea salt. Nuts, in general, make for healthy snacks. A 1-oz. serving of the sea salt oven roasted almonds provides 170 calories, 15 g fat (only 1 g saturated fat), 5 g carbohydrates, 6 g protein, 3 g dietary fiber and 135 mg sodium. In addition to being naturally (nearly) sugar-free, these almond snacks are nutrient-rich. One serving is a good/excellent source of vitamin E, riboflavin (B2), phosphorus, copper, magnesium and manganese. Protein-rich vegan snacks: Nutrition beyond compare Steamed or boiled soybeans (in the pod) with sea salt: this snack only takes a small amount of preparation. You’ll need 1/4 lb. fresh soybeans or 4 ounces frozen (bagged); Kosher or sea salt and rice crackers (these make a nice accompaniment). In a pot of boiling water, add the soybeans and cook until they are bright green (about 5 minutes). Drain and refresh in cold water. Sprinkle with salt and serve with a couple of rice crackers. A 1-cup serving of prepared soybeans (without salt or crackers) provides 189 calories, 8 g fat (only 1 g saturated), 16 g carbohydrates, a whopping 17 g of protein and 8 g dietary fiber (roughly 1/3 of your daily requirement) and 7 mg sodium (naturally occurring). Soybeans are nutrition superstars. In addition to being an excellent source of omega-3 fatty...

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Is It Right For You? Choosing a Diet Book/Plan

Posted by on Sep 22, 2011 in weight loss | 0 comments

Successful weight loss means making small changes toward a healthy lifestyle. Make sure your weight loss plan is right for you. Ask yourself these questions; does it include: • Foods from all ‘food groups’ and sub-categories? • At least the minimum number of servings from each group? • Foods you will enjoy eating for the rest of your life (it should not be a ‘short-term’ fix. • Foods you can buy at the supermarket? • Some of your favorite foods? • Foods that fit your budget and lifestyle? • Regular physical activity or exercise? If the answer is “yes” to all the questions, your weight loss plan may be right for...

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